#Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow (Nevermoor, #1): It’s Wunderous!

Nevermoor

Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow (Nevermoor, #1)
By: Jessica Townsend
My Rating: FIVE out of FIVE Stars
Best for: 12 and up

This is the first book in a new upper-middle grade series, and guess what? It was great!

You think you have it bad? There’s no way your life is worse than Morrigan Crow’s.

Morrigan Crow was born on Eventide…and that makes her a Cursed Child. Lose the spelling bee? Break your leg? Not enough sun? To much rain? Stomach ache? It’s Morrigan’s fault. It’s especially bad to be a Cursed Child when your dad is a politician and everyone knows who you are. Morrigan has to write apology notes every week to all the people hurt by her curse.

Sounds bad, right? It is. But it’s not the worst. What’s the worst part of being a Cursed Child?

You die on your 11th birthday.

At least, that’s what Morrigan expects to happen. So when she’s rescued by a mysterious stranger on the night of her birthday and taken to the magical city of Nevermoor, she can’t believe her luck. She also can’t believe why she was rescued–she is going to compete for a spot in the Wunderous Society, the brotherhood and sisterhood of the most Wunder full and talented people in the world. But what does her benefactor see in her that no one else–not even herself–sees? What does she have to offer the Wunderous Society?

A lot, obviously. But you’ll have to read it to find out!

I loved Morrigan Crow! It unashamedly sticks to the Harry-Potter formula, which works perfectly. Some Harry Potter rip-offs just rub the wrong way in their blatant copying and lack of originality. I didn’t like The Iron Trials by Holly Black, for example. But I thought the Trials of Morrigan Crow was excellent! There is enough unique to set it apart, the writing is fantastic, the characters are strong, and imagination in the world building is wonderful! Or maybe I should say Wunderous…

Content appropriate for all readers. It’s over 500 pages though, so maybe too long for younger readers to tackle alone. 12 and up, but accessible to advanced younger readers too.

Happy Reading!

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